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Royal Galleries of Saint Hubert (Les Galeries St-Hubert)
Royal Galleries of Saint Hubert (Les Galeries St-Hubert)

Royal Galleries of Saint Hubert (Les Galeries St-Hubert)

Galeries du roi 5, Brussels, Belgium

The Basics

Designed by architect Jean-Pierre Cluysenaer, the Renaissance-style galleries consist of the twin King’s and Queen’s Galleries, each measuring 330 feet (100 meters) long, and the smaller Prince’s Gallery. Crowned by glass-paned roofs that shelter visitors whatever the weather, the arcades are filled with fashion, book, chocolate, and jewelry boutiques, as well as artsy coffee houses, restaurants, a theater, and a cinema.

While most people visit independently, local guides can identify points and shops of interest and share tales from the Royal Galleries’ long and rich history. The galleries feature as a stop on most Brussels walking tours, and their chocolate shops are included on many chocolate and food tours. Several hop-on hop-off buses also handily stop nearby at the Central Station.

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Things to Know Before You Go

  • The Royal Galleries of Saint Hubert are a must-visit for shoppers, as well as architecture and history aficionados.

  • Allow two to three hours for a visit.

  • The galleries are stroller friendly and fully wheelchair accessible.

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How to Get There

The Royal Galleries sit on the Rue du Marche-aux-Herbes, accessible to pedestrians via a lane leading from the northwest corner of the Grand Place. Alternatively, the galleries can be reached on tram lines 3, 4, 51, 92, and 94, plus many public bus routes. The nearest train station is Brussels Central Station (Gare Centrale). While driving in central Brussels can be challenging, paid parking is available in the nearby Rue de l’Ecuyer.

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Trip ideas

Bruges Tours from Brussels

Bruges Tours from Brussels


When to Get There

The galleries are open daily, year round. To enjoy them when they’re relatively quiet, the best time to visit is in the morning. Shop and restaurant opening hours vary.

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What Not to Miss at the Galleries

As you browse the shops, take time to appreciate some of the architectural details of the arcades. Highlights include the arched glass roofs with their intricate metalwork and fish-scale tiles, and the graceful bend between the King’s and Queen’s Galleries—introduced by Cluysenaer to break up the long arcades. It’s also worth checking out the Taverne du Passage, an art deco brasserie in the Queen’s Gallery; it was once a meeting place of writers such as Victor Hugo and Alexander Dumas.

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